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Military Police branch will receive their new 9 mm service pistol in 2024: the C24

OceanBonfire

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The C24 is built on the Sig Sauer P320 platform, specifically the carry frame (medium profile), in contrast to the CA C22, which utilizes the full frame design (large profile). A human factors assessment revealed that the ergonomics of the carry frame were more suitable for police-related tasks, all while maintaining the 17-round magazine, a vast improvement over the Sig Sauer P225 and Browning 9 mm pistols.

The C24 offers a wealth of benefits to its users, as MP-specific requirements informed both the identification and definition stages of the project. The focus was on modularity. This will ensure the performance of the pistol over the full spectrum of MP Operations while meeting the needs of the individual user. Its modular design enables customized adjustments, while offering three sizes of grip modules upon implementation, along with a rail system to accommodate future attachments (e.g. red dot sights and flashlights). Finally, the pistol is fully ambidextrous, which will standardize weapon handling for both left and right-handed shooters.

The C24 is well-suited for the distinctive roles across various specialties of the MP branch. A conversion kit will allow the C24 to feature the compact frame (small profile) suitable for concealed use, all while retaining a 15-round magazine. While the compact model prioritizes a lower profile, both sizes of pistols have demonstrated enhanced performance for both in the field and garrison use.

 
Meanwhile, the RCMP continues to drag ass through their own pistol procurement...
The RCMP pistol replacement program is in it's infancy compared to how long it took the CAF to complete theirs. The Mounties are working hard to avoid the procurement process pitfalls which befell the CAF over the years.
 
The RCMP pistol replacement program is in it's infancy compared to how long it took the CAF to complete theirs. The Mounties are working hard to avoid the procurement process pitfalls which befell the CAF over the years.
For a general service pistol maybe, but how long have the MP's carried a Sig as their duty pistol?
 
Interesting, I'd have thought it would have been more recent.

EDIT: Wikipedia would suggest (not a good source, I know) 2001 as an introductory date.
Seems around right. I was inspecting their ammo lockup in Gagetown around then and it was the shiny new thing.
 
If the RCMP and the military sold their pistols in batches into the US, it could easily fund the pistol replacement program.
Never happen. They'd be smelted first.

Imagine the left wing uproar and political fallout for JT @ Co. if a former CAF or RCMP pistol was used in a crime in the US? The anti-gunners would be all over that like ugly on an ape!

I can't recall if the Mountie pistol are distinctively marked. My agency's pistols have custom engraving identifying them as agency firearms.
 
Never happen. They'd be smelted first.

Imagine the left wing uproar and political fallout for JT @ Co. if a former CAF or RCMP pistol was used in a crime in the US? The anti-gunners would be all over that like ugly on an ape!

I can't recall if the Mountie pistol are distinctively marked. My agency's pistols have custom engraving identifying them as agency firearms.
They are, they're laser etched with RCMP GRC and the mounted rider.
 
Never happen. They'd be smelted first.

Imagine the left wing uproar and political fallout for JT @ Co. if a former CAF or RCMP pistol was used in a crime in the US? The anti-gunners would be all over that like ugly on an ape!

I can't recall if the Mountie pistol are distinctively marked. My agency's pistols have custom engraving identifying them as agency firearms.

While I don't think it was widely publicized back then, when we were closing out CFE (30 years ago), one story going around was that some of the firearms that had been the property of the Lahr Rod and Gun Club (an NPF activity) had ended up in the hands of organized crime in France and were used in at least one murder.
 
While I don't think it was widely publicized back then, when we were closing out CFE (30 years ago), one story going around was that some of the firearms that had been the property of the Lahr Rod and Gun Club (an NPF activity) had ended up in the hands of organized crime in France and were used in at least one murder.

I can think of 22 different ways that could have happened.
 
Interesting, I'd have thought it would have been more recent.

EDIT: Wikipedia would suggest (not a good source, I know) 2001 as an introductory date.
It was 2001- there was a change to the building of one of their guardhouses around a small arms range issue when they rolled it out around that time that I was adjacent to.
 
Never happen. They'd be smelted first.

Imagine the left wing uproar and political fallout for JT @ Co. if a former CAF or RCMP pistol was used in a crime in the US? The anti-gunners would be all over that like ugly on an ape!

I can't recall if the Mountie pistol are distinctively marked. My agency's pistols have custom engraving identifying them as agency firearms.
Sadly there is no uproar about the destruction of history or the wasting of the sacrifices our grandparents made in WWII (In regards to the BHP's)
 
Meanwhile, the RCMP continues to drag ass through their own pistol procurement...
Once I had a dream, and in this dream all federal employees who carried a pistol would have the same pistol, in once mass order. This is of course insanity and would ignore the possibility of 6-10 independent procurement processes.
 
Once I had a dream, and in this dream all federal employees who carried a pistol would have the same pistol, in once mass order. This is of course insanity and would ignore the possibility of 6-10 independent procurement processes.
I'll go ahead and ruin that dream by saying even the different branches of the RCMP need different types of pistol, let alone all the branches of the Federal Government. There no reason we couldn't all have the same manufacturer with specific models, though.
 
Once I had a dream, and in this dream all federal employees who carried a pistol would have the same pistol, in once mass order. This is of course insanity and would ignore the possibility of 6-10 independent procurement processes.
Having once experienced an interdepartmental procurement process, I will merely observe that dental surgery without anaesthetic while getting kicked in the groin by a 300 pound individual wearing Doc Martens for a month straight would probably be less frustrating and painful.
 
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